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There’s plenty of history in the making here at the National Civil Rights Museum.

This How We Do It: Celebration

Ain’t gonna hurt nobody to get on down! - Brick   Summer’s here and the time is right for dancing in the street - Martha and The Vandellas   This is how we do it It’s Friday night and I feel alright The party’s here on the West side – Montell Jordan   Summer, summer, summertime Time to sit back and unwind - DJ Jazzy Jeff & The Fresh Prince ... Read More
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Freedom and Liberation

“Freedom has never been free.”  – Medgar Evers “We who believe in freedom cannot rest” – Ella Baker “I am not free while any woman is unfree, even when  her shackles are very different from my own. And I am not free as long as one person of Color remains chained. Nor is anyone of you.”  -Audre Lorde This week’s theme is Freedom & Liberation. Friday is Juneteenth, the holiday commemorating the emancipation... Read More
Posted by Connie Dyson at Wednesday, June 17, 2020
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Bayard Rustin: Strategist, Organizer, Unifier

As he approached the podium, Bayard Rustin was determined and elated. He expected about 100,000 marchers to converge at the Washington Monument on August 28, 1963. To his delight, approximately 250,000 people cheered as he listed the demands of the march. The March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom began after eight weeks of recruiting marchers, coordinating buses and marshals, scheduling speakers, and managing logistics. Despite Rustin’s critical role as the march’s chief... Read More
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U.N.I.T.Y.: Pride & Identity

“Don’t let anybody tell you what to do, be who you want to be.” – Marsha P. Johnson   “We are people, of the mighty Mighty people of the sun.” – Earth Wind & Fire This week’s theme is Pride & Identity. Pride & Identity is more than the celebration of self-acceptance. The songs on this week’s list show the challenges of being oneself in a world that is reluctant to accept our self-identity.  This is... Read More
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The Revolution Will Not Be Televised

The National Civil Rights Museum Celebrates Black Music Month Music has been intrinsically linked with the Civil Rights Movement and African American history. Our celebration of Black Music Month began as a way to connect with you during this pandemic. However, as the current moment has unfolded, it has become a way for us to use music to educate, heal, reflect, and inspire. Each week, we will release a themed playlist curated by the NCRM staff. Share with us your recommendations using... Read More
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The Very Real Pain of Racism

By Terri Lee Freeman, Museum President I have always looked at the glass as half full as opposed to empty.  But even so, I consider myself more of a pragmatist than an optimist.  As an African American woman, I’ve experienced how ugly the world can be.  I’ve experienced both blatant and more insidious racism.  I’ve been called a nigger. I’ve been assumed to be the assistant to my white CFO when, in fact, I was the CEO.  I’ve watched... Read More
at Thursday, May 28, 2020
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Black America Gets Pneumonia

From Black Enterprise , May 24, 2020 by Terri Lee Freeman Just as 9/11 defined the new millennium, the novel coronavirus will certainly be the story of the decade.  The global pandemic has caused a devastating public health crisis, initiated a global economic disaster, and in the United States, pulled back the curtain on the  deep-rooted racial inequities  that persist. Just as COVID-19 is a deadly virus, so is the disease of racism, particularly systemic racism.... Read More
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Unsung Freedom Riders, Part II

Over the summer of 1961, 329 people from across the country, both black and white, boarded buses and headed south. The Freedom Rides set out to test federal law banning segregation in bus and train terminals across the South. After facing violence in Alabama, Jackson, Mississippi became the end of the line. From May to September, activists flooded into town. They came by bus and by airplane. Each in turn was arrested and photographed. The notorious Mississippi State Penitentiary, known... Read More
at Wednesday, May 20, 2020
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Gradual Matriculation: Brown vs. Board of Education

White columns guide you when entering the Brown vs Board of Education exhibition. On the right are pews and a short video recapping the world-changing U.S. Supreme Court decision on May 17, 1954, 66 years ago this week.  For 89 years, schools across the South were racially segregated and drastically different. Despite a court order stating “separate but equal” facilities were constitutional, inequity ran rampant in southern schools. The NAACP successfully argued that... Read More
at Wednesday, May 20, 2020
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We Were Prepared to Die: Freedom Riders

Fifty-nine years ago, the Freedom Rides of 1961 entered the state of Alabama. Potential violence awaited in Anniston and Birmingham. Below, the backstory of how the Freedom Rides began and how one of the most pivotal protests in the Civil Rights Movement came about. While we know the names of notable activists like James Lawson and Diane Nash, there are numerous overlooked details behind the scenes of this epic event. The Freedom Riders story began fifteen years earlier in 1946 when... Read More
at Thursday, May 14, 2020
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